National Command & Staff College

EQi 2.0 Assessment

The Emotional Quotient Inventory 2.0 (EQ-i 2.0) measures an individual’s emotional intelligence. Science and professional feedback from the EQ-i® strengthened the direction of this second generation assessment. Now, it’s a complete experience with a new and intuitive model, customizable reports, and an online platform for easy administration.

Key Features:

  • Generate a total EI score with five composite scores measuring distinct aspects of emotional and social functioning
  • Gain a deeper understanding of how the results affect a participant’s workplace performance (conflict resolution, change management, teamwork, decision making and more) with strategies customized based on individual results
  • Make instant connections between subscales and help participants leverage EI strengths and improve EI weaknesses
  • Use the Well-Being Indicator to measure your client’s level of happiness; resulting in additional developmental opportunities
  • Target solutions at every level with a multi-level approach to developing EI
  • Reports are designed with clear instructions, interpretation guidelines and results-driven content setting you up for success

Dr. Richard Conroy’s combined law enforcement and academic experience extends over four decades. Specific to law enforcement, he has served as a Director of Police at the university level, an Assistant Chief of Police at the municipal level, and a Special Agent in Charge at the state level. Prior to executive level leadership positions, he worked through the law enforcement career ranks, including communications, uniformed patrol, canine, undercover operations, and criminal investigations. Rich is a results oriented problem-solver with experience and career long work in the specialized area of public safety crisis intervention. He has participated in numerous critical incident stress debriefings (CISD) as a member of the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation (ICISF).  Rich is a graduate of the 150th session of the FBI National Academy as well as a life-member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP).  He is a member of the National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA) and has held membership in the FBI National Academy Associates in four different states. Read more …